Question: Could Anyone Or Can Anyone?

Should I use can or could?

The modal verbs can and could represent the ability of a person or thing in doing something.

However, there is a difference in their usage, as ‘can’ is used in present situation, whereas we can use ‘could’ for talking about a past ability.

Both are followed by a base form of the verb..

Can I have or could I have?

For example, “Could I please have some water?” Could is the past tense of can. However, when asking for permission, could does not have a past tense meaning. Could has the same meaning as may when making requests. It is equally polite to say “Could I leave early?” or “May I leave early?”

Could be done or can be done?

The difference between your two examples is that the first one is incorrect, and the second one is correct. You cannot mix the present tense (“can”) with the perfect tense (“have done”). The word “could” is the subjunctive (mood of possibility), so it fits better in this example.

Can I please or could I please?

Both are correct. The first is more direct, and the second is more polite. Could you please . . . gives slightly more room for refusal than Can you please . . .

Where is could used?

“Could” is a modal verb used to express possibility or past ability as well as to make suggestions and requests. “Could” is also commonly used in conditional sentences as the conditional form of “can.” Examples: Extreme rain could cause the river to flood the city.

Will you vs Can you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

Could you please help me meaning?

Could you help me is a polite way of saying “Will you please take the time to help me?” It should be said with a diffident smile, and delivered not as a demand, but as a request.

Could you VS would you?

The most proper way to use these words is to use “could” if you’re not sure if the person is able to do something. … If you know the person is capable of doing what is asked, then it’s better to use “would”.

Can you give or could you give?

You’d typically say this to a friend, family member or workmate. The second is a polite request, which you could use in any situation. … ‘Can you give me a hand..’ is even more common, and it is in-between your two examples in terms of politeness.

Could VS can when asking a question?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Could Can examples?

We use could to show that something is possible, but not certain:They could come by car. (= Maybe they will come by car.) … It can be very cold here in winter. … That can’t be true. … It’s ten o’clock. … It could be very cold there in winter. … They know the way here. … She can speak several languages. … I can see you.More items…

What more I can ask for?

Is very happy or content; doesn’t have any further requests to improve something because it is exactly as desired. I’m just thrilled with my new job—I really couldn’t ask for more.

Can I ask you or could I ask you?

It is grammatically correct to say, “Could I ask you something.” You could also say, “May I ask you something?” to be extremely polite. “Can I ask you something?” is for a present moment question. Could is related to can.

Can you or can I grammar?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Could you tell me vs Can you tell me?

2 Answers. “Could you” is more polite than “can you”. Regarding the rest of the wording, something about “tell me my next work” rings wrong to my ears. Probably, because you don’t “tell a work”.